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20131101
20131130
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KQED (PBS) 25
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English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
on talks with iran; curbing the cost of health care in massachusetts; what judicial gridlock means for the federal courts; and the legacy of lincoln's most famous speech. >> ifill: j.p. morgan's $13 billion settlement brings months of delicate, high stakes negotiations to an end. under the terms of the deal, $4 billion will go to struggling homeowners in the form of reduced mortgage payments, lower loan rates and other assistance, $7 billion will go to investors as compensation; the remainder will be fines paid by the bank. the agreement comes as investigators are said to be pursuing cases against other financial institutions. some assessment now of the deal's significance and its problems. lynn stout is a professor of business law at cornell university. she closely watches financial regulation. and bert ely is a banking consultant. what's your first sense of this deal? was it a good deal for anybody? >> well, i think as much as anything else it gets these problems behind jane morgan chase. they had a tentative deal a few weeks ago but now they can get this behind them and move on
in massachusetts, and became so outraged by how politics adversely affected her patients that she became the green party candidate for president in 2012. inevitably, the paths of these two crossed. and in the proud tradition of american civil disobedience, they have joined hands to take on the system together, fighting against political corruption and a host of grievances that have led many others to cynicism and despair. each is a member of the green shadow cabinet, a group that offers policy alternatives to our dysfunctional government, and just days ago, they joined with the group nukefree.org to present a petition to the un -- 150,000 signatures -- asking the world to intercede at the fukushima nuclear plant in japan. the meltdown of reactors there after the earthquake and tsunami of march 2011 still threatens much of the world with radiation. japanese officials now say that residents of the area will never be able to return to their homes. radiation from the disaster has reached alaska and the canadian scientist david suzuki recently called attention to research saying that another quake hitt
for massachusetts. here's mitt romney's response. quote. nothing has changed my view that a plan crafted to fit the unique circumstances of a single state should not be grafted on to the entire country. health reform is best crafted by state with bipartisan support and input from its employers as we did without raising taxes and by carefully phasing it in to avoid the type of disruption we are seeing nationally, unquote. romney, by the way, was not invited to attend the president's annual hall speech. defending obama care. >> question, who aside from mitt romney sees the current chaos as disruptive? >> i think romney was right on the mark there. when you have a bipartisan, when the governor is helping you out to implement the program and the government is part of the program, it works. the state that is receptive to government in healthcare. when you go to mississippi, of course, they will do everything to throw monkey wrenches into the process who don't want to implement it. this is his statement. goes directly with obama is saying. wanting the thing to work and not wanting to work. >> ther
reporters that when the state of massachusetts passed its own law, enrollment there started very slowly, just 123 people in the first month. >> we know experience in the bay >> wooduff: mary agnes carey of kaiser health news is with us again tonight. it's an editorially independent news organization. mary agnes, welcome back to the program. so what did we learn today from the administration's official release of these numbers? >> well, they're lower than expected. administration officials for days, for weeks, have been trying to dampen expectations. these numbers would be great, and they certainly were not. of the 10 6,000 people that have enrolled, you have about a quarter of those through the federal exchanges, and those are in 36 states. that's really a big chunk of states that are being run by the federal government, the exchanges, and then the remaining three-fourths were three the state exchanges set up in about 15 states and the district of column ja. >> woodruff: three to one that number reflects the state exchanges. to what extension is this consistent with what the administrat
's insurance fix and will not let insurers fix cancelled plans. they are joining massachusetts, new york and this is where the enrollment is going well so they don't want to disrupt that. >> bertha coombs, appreciate it. >>> coming up, a look at baltimore's leaky infrastructure and the money being washed away with it as mission critical, fixing american cities continues. >>> google is coming out with something new. they will offer a prepaid debit card so you can pay at stores and withdrawal cash from atms. it's called the wallet card because it's tied to a smart phone app that works like paypal. the card will be free with no monthly or annual fees. >>> shares of tesla have taken a pounding after a series of battery fires but owners of tesla still love their cars and a new consumererer port says tesla model s received the highest customer satisfaction rating of any car the magazine surveys in years with owners giving the score 99 out of 100. >> wow. >>> all this week nbr looked at troubled finances of big american cities. today, we looked at baltimore plagued by leaks, not leaks of inform
is he lived in massachusetts. >> rose: concord, massachusetts. >> conway. and at the end it was boylston near harvard but he'd been librarian of congress. so he would come at new year, every new years the macleash brothers would get together and have had the fix there and my dad's folks would come until. adlai stevenson, james farley who was former postmaster general. >> rose: he was a campaign guy. >> so he came and one time i said -- you know, i was 11. i said, you know, archie, what -- i don't understand what some of your poems mean." and he said "i have a famous quote, haven't you read it?" i said no, sir, i have not." he said "well, a poem must not mean, it must be." and that's a famous quote of his. and the other quote is i was always fascinate bade book of collected poems he wrote and he said how do you get -- i was like 16 now. i said "how do you get to a point where you have a title like that on a collected book of poems?" he says "i'll tell you, 1924 i left yale and went to paris because that was the thing to do. and they were all there, trust me. you folks think you got collec
turkey. >> reporter: in fact, while the 1621 celebration in plymouth, massachusetts, is sparsely documented, it probably didn't much resemble today's thanksgiving in a lot of ways, including what you might call its economics. the pilgrims, who had already moved toward a cash exchange economy in europe, encountered native people with very different attitudes. toward real estate, for instance. >> the land that was here was for everybody to use. we didn't believe in possessing or owning land. >> reporter: tim turner manages the wampanoag indigenous program at plimoth. >> you might see somebody use a piece of land, but there was never a fence. you were crossing people's property all the time. people were cutting through your homesite all the time. so, our concept of land ownership versus the concept uh that the english had was totally different. >> reporter: also totally different it appears: the wampanoag, though they did trade with each other, weren't profit maximizers. >> you weren't trying to make a profit or look better than anybody else. you took more than everybody else people
companies. bills to legalize online gambling is pending in massachusetts, pennsylvania and california. thousands are gathering at the national museum of the u.s. air force in dayton, ohio to honor members of the doolittle raiders. the group of pilots who bombed japan in response to the japanese attack on pearl harbor. their attack is credited with turning the tide in the pacific. there's the three surviving members of the group. they will be toasting comrades with cognac from 1896 the year doolittle was born. >>> now to our signature segment. in depth reports from around the nation and the world. tonight we return to a topic we focused on last weekend the high cost of prescription drugs. something many americans have been complaining about for years. one state has recently passed legislation designed to bring down drug costs. residents of maine can order drugs from maine and from overseas. this has prompted a lawsuit. >> reporter: the battle between the state of maine and the pharmaceutical industry started in portland when the city found a way to cut its health care costs. by the tim
domain but don't want the expensive lawsuits. >> boston massachusetts looked at it and rejected it and north las vegas examined it and decided that was not for them. >> reporter: now richmond's mayor is talking to california cities and wants to form a joint powers authority to take on banks with more cloud. >> we've waited for the banks, federal government to step in and provide a solution. it hasn't been forthcoming so the city is doing this, this common sense fix. >> reporter: jeffrey wright believes the fix is in if the plan passes. investors won't want to make loans in richmond and giving false hope to homeowners, one that pulled out of a short sale. >> there is a high likelihood this person may very well lose their property when they could have sold it on a short sale because they are waiting on a program that is not up and running and may never be. >> reporter: it may not be up and running here but with cities still trying to solve the crisis five years in, it may get going somewhere. for "nightly business report", i'm jane wells. >>> and that's "nightly business report" f
waiting to see whether they come up with one at the white house. the president was in massachusetts this week. and he was making the case that it took a while for them to get their health care plan right. and he also was -- began the digging exercise. let's listen to a little bit of what he had to say. >> there's no denying it. right now, the website is too slow, too many people have gotten stuck. and i am not happy about it. and neither are a lot of americans who need health care. and they're trying to figure out how they can sign up as quickly as possible. so there's no excuse for it. and i take full responsibility for making sure it gets fixed asap. we are working overtime to improve it every day. gwen: everybody's taking responsibility. anything changing? >> well, again, if this gets fixed in a few days or a week, i think that the long-term consequences may not be so bad. gwen: give it a little more than a week, karen. >> but this does remind me of in the tone of the president's voice, reminds me of the b.p. oil spill. where you could just sort of see the frustration. and yet, y
as "quantitative easing." on the democratic side, elizabeth warren of massachusetts complained the fed still isn't doing enough to limit the size and dominance of big banks. >> the truth is if the regulators had done their jobs and reined in the banks, we wouldn't need to be talking about quantitative easing because we could have avoided the 2008 crisis altogether. >> reporter: yellen agreed with the need to increase monitoring of the financial system. she also noted that the government shutdown and debt ceiling brinksmanship have hindered efforts to boost the economy. looking ahead, yellen pledged to continue the push by outgoing fed chairman ben bernanke for greater transparency in what the fed is doing and how. >> woodruff: now to our newsmaker interview with b. todd jones, the new director of the federal bureau of alcohol, firearms, tobacco and explosives. the agency, charged with keeping track of the nation's 300 million guns, lacked a permanent head for the last seven years. jones was appointed shortly after the tragic shooting at sandy hook elementary in newtown, connecticut, and confirme
, as governor deval patrick laid a wreath at the kennedy statue, outside the massachusetts statehouse. >> ♪ oh beautiful... ♪ america, america ♪ >> across the >> reporter: across the city, music marked the day at the john f. kennedy presidential library and museum. ♪ and excerpts of his speeches were read aloud, including the address to the nation on civil rights, in june of 1963, five months before the assassination. >> we are confronted primarily with a moral issue. it is as old as the scriptures and as clear as the american constitution. the heart of the question is whether all americans are to be afforded equal rights and equal opportunities. >> reporter: the remembrances extended around the world as well. in britain, kennedy's granddaughter-- tatiana schlossberg-- laid a wreath at a memorial to the slain president. >> we have come here today to honor his memory as this monument does so well. but today is a difficult day as it is a reminder of a moment of profound sadness for my family, for america and for the world. >> reporter: and back in washington, the 44th president met with
was auctioned off at sotheby's in new york. it was printed in 1640 by the leaders of the massachusetts bay colony. only 11 copies are known to survive. auctioneer david redden explained what the buyer intends to do with it. >> it sold for $14 million to david rubenstein a philanthropist who will be sharing it with libraries around this country and eventually putting it on long term deposit at one of those libraries. >> ifill: the seller of the book was boston's old south church, which sold it to finance its ongoing ministries. the church still has another copy. president obama kicked off the thanksgiving holiday early at the white house today with the traditional annual turkey pardon. flanked by his daughters, the president officially saved a bird named "popcorn" from ending up on a thanksgiving table. a second, back-up turkey named "caramel" was also pardoned but didn't appear at the ceremony. pardoned turkeys end up at george washington's mount vernon estate in virginia. still to come on the "newshour": another delay for the health care law; the bribery scandal that's rocked the navy; te
after medical school. >> chose the one at the massachusetts general hospital for the reason that it was the most biologically oriented. i'm quite opposed to psychoanalytics -- >> rose: you took the words out of my mouth. are you in sync with the notion nathat neuroscience has overcome psychiatry? >> i am and i was, and that's precisely why-- i mean, i think, you know, the psychiatry, the psychoanalysis, the theory that was rooted in really nothing but speculation and wonderful writing it's freudian theories and the offshoots -- really had to yield to the coming of the knowledge in neurology, behavioral psychiatry, et cetera. and that's why i chose a program where they emphasized that. and that is what really fascinated me, the interaction between the brain and behavior. but old stuff, look, i don't-- i don't want to denigrate it. it works for some people, but i'm not really into the interior life, so after about six years, seven year of medicine, i thought well maybe if you're not interested in the interior life, psychiatry is not for you. and that's why i left. >> rose: it
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)